Explore Lab 18

Integrating Street Vendors in Jakarta’s Streetscape

Integrating Street Vendors in Jakarta’s Streetscape

Esti Tichelaar

Project description

Evolutionary Resilience: An approach to in-situ slum upgrading in post disaster communities

Evolutionary Resilience: An approach to in-situ slum upgrading in post disaster communities

Anne-Sophie van der Spek

Most projects within the architecture curriculum prepares its students to work for wealthy clients leading to the design of a private studio, the expansion of a faculty or the design of a museum of contemporary art, to name a few. Today, the economic recession has ensured “there is much less meat for the same amount of animals” (Timberg, 2012). After a rather costly study of the profession, recent graduates are forced to accept whatever comes their path to “full-time employment with internship wages” (Timberg, 2012). There has been a significant decline observed in job opportunities in most architecture firms. “Non-traditional job opportunities for architects have never been better and we should see the decline of traditional jobs not as a “meltdown” (Timberg, 2012) of architecture, but as the beginning of its rebirth” (Fisher, 2012). I have been looking at the concept of Evolutionary resilience as a plausible approach to in-situ settlement upgrading processes. My pilot case for this approach is the post disaster informal settlement in Valparaiso, Chile, where I have designed new public space with a children day care centre.

Thomas Steigenga

Clara Jansen
The Architecture of Pleasure : a new recreational pier for Scheveningen

The Architecture of Pleasure : a new recreational pier for Scheveningen

Robin van Zeeland

Scheveningen, the largest seaside resort in the Netherlands, is currently slipping into a phase of decline and possibly decay. Scheveningen’s pier, also one of few of the nation’s landmarks, is representative of this. The pier, which opened in 1961, designed by the Dutch architect Hugh Maaskant, was closed in October of 2013 due to the unsafe state of the pier deck and islands. As program of pleasure is no longer profitable at the seaside resort, owners are having trouble to cope with maintenance costs, resulting in a poor and unsafe built environment. A seaside resort once so glorious is now struggling.

Fairtransport Wharf: the tolerance for change in listed monuments

Fairtransport Wharf: the tolerance for change in listed monuments

Thijs Bennebroek

Defining the tolerance for change in listed monuments with the redevelopment of a 17th-century Warehouse in Harlingen, The Netherlands.

Listed monuments are buildings we ought to preserve. However, more and more monuments lose their functions and become vacant. So in order to preserve our buildings nowadays, reuse is necessary.

Reuse demands change, which conflicts with the idea of preservation. So how do these two tolerate each other? In my project the tolerance for change in listed monuments is defined by different theories and instruments. These can be used as a method for communication between different stakeholders acting on the reuse of a listed monument.

The theories and instruments are developed and tested with a single object, a Warehouse in Harlingen, The Netherlands, dating from 1657 and owned by Vereniging Hendrick de Keyser since 1930. This very deep building, with a strange plan of 7 by 42 m is located in the historical centre between a harbour and an alley. With the results of the research, a redesign for this warehouse into a wharf for the Fairtransport Shipping Company is made. They will use the building for storage, store, workshop and dwellings, while mooring their ships in front of the building.

Mafundi EXPO

Mafundi EXPO

Frank Reitsma

Rapid urbanisation is a pressing issue in the global south, bringing forth the challenges of informal urbanisation that proliferates when the state is unable to produce adequate and affordable living conditions for the expanding urban population. [Under informal urbanisation problems arise in terms of inadequate access to water, sanitation, living space, durable shelter and security of tenure]. Dar es Salaam in Tanzania is being confronted by these processes, the city currently comprises of an estimated 4,5 million inhabitants of whom 80% live in informal, under serviced and unplanned settlements. Government has not been able to provide the institutional and infrastructural frameworks for inclusive growth. This thesis aims to investigate the phenomenon of informal urbanisation in Dar es Salaam in order to formulate a housing policy beneficial to the substandard housing conditions in the unplanned and under serviced settlements. Three theoretical frameworks are therefore presented; firstly determining the root causes of the unplanned and under serviced areas in Dar es Salaam to come into existence, secondly reflecting on a housing policy overview towards to the unplanned and under serviced settlements in Dar es Salaam, and thirdly theorising the ethical considerations when proposing a housing policy for the situation. The constraints drawn from the frameworks, guide the formulation of a housing policy integrated within current local government policy and the international aid agenda. The strategy presented negotiates the tradeoffs between the collective interest and the individuals right to the city, by targeting the informal construction professionals, mafundi, to mitigate top down control and the bottom up reach. The targeted mafundi, uneducated and not formally organised, are enabled with technical tools and knowledge on constructing a redesigned affordable housing typology in line with the collective interest. Democratic distribution of knowledge on improving current informal building practice, with technology, materials and typologies is proposed in an Expo that makes explicit in full scale new scenario’s for the process of housing. The proposal is situated within the government, Cities Alliance and UN Habitats’ ‘Action Plan for Upgrading Unplanned and Under serviced Settlements in Dar es Salaam’ in which there are funds available for the capacity building of local artisans in housing construction. The informal construction professional is proposed to build the link between a government of little means, and an inadequately housed rapidly growing public. Presenting a hypothesis for housing policy that aligns to the mutual benefit of both government, mafundi and inhabitants, as a viable contribution to the improvement of the substandard living conditions in the settlements of Dar es Salaam.

Priscilla Uncu’s Project

Priscilla Uncu

Project Description

The role of the architect in collective private commission projects in the Netherlands

The role of the architect in collective private commission projects in the Netherlands

Tessa Smit

Collective Private Commission, a term used for groups of citizens who develop their own housing together, is an growing building trend in society. However, lack of research and experience makes it hard for architects to develop a clear vision on how to involve residents in their design process.

The research concludes that architects need to a) really listen to people, to integrate what is essential to them in the design, b) guard the groups priorities through the design process and c) acknowledge themselves as experts: create strong architecture. The architect and future residents need to treat each other as ‘partners’, but with different expertise.
To enable this partnership to work, investigation is done after a shared language to make design understandable for non-architects. The chosen method translated architectural solutions into understandable schemes and was tested in a given workshop.
The design phase is a constructed process of collective private commission, using a real group as example and extending the design assignment trough a vision on the role these projects should fulfill in the city. It uses as input a) a location analysis b) results from the workshop given and c) information from the target groups.
The result is the design of approximately 70 dwellings for different target groups within a strong architectural lay-out, around a central garden which contains community facilities. The architects role is to create an inspiring environment, in which the residents have freedom to adjust their homes and communal spaces to their wishes.

Making a fairbnb

Making a fairbnb

Alexander Mooi

My project consists of a strategy and a pilot design project on how to realise 
a fair B&B system within the Amsterdam city centre. A fairbnb is a socially and architecturally sustainable solution
, combining the demands of the locals and the tourists, offering a viable alternative through an architect initiated project, using tourism as a force for good, hopefully resulting in added value for society as a whole.  It offers affordable housing in combination with B&B facilities, incorporating facilities for both tourist and locals to enjoy, by letting the tourist pay for the affordable housing.