Explore Lab 20

The impact of 3D printing on architecture

The impact of 3D printing on architecture

Tiwánee van der Horst

Changes are taking place globally and locally; the critical situation of global economics and the increased fragility of society have shifted focus towards more concrete and problematic issues of today. Such as the growing need for urban housing and environmental change. It brings about change in environmentally ethical attitudes of the architect towards the available materials, resulting in a synergetic new architecture. This change in itself is not new. But, I will continue the rethought of the Arts and Crafts Movement through emerging technologies, which might open doors to new architecture for future urban dwellers in an environmentally conscious way. Therefore, I will research and design new ways of urban living from an architectural perspective driven by 21st century technological and material developments. By proposing architectural solutions with 3D printing and bio plastic I seek to elicit a reaction in the field of engineering and material science in order to accelerate developments towards a circular economy.

 

 

‘Terminal Architecture’

‘Terminal Architecture’

Tom Thijssen

My fascination lays in the social and emotional functioning of our surroundings. The ‘favourite place’ is central in this fascination; in a world becoming more homogeneous everyday, distinction from one place to another, and consequently affection for one place specific, may become more difficult.  I have a special connection with the word and the idea: ‘place’. This started in my bachelor, (landscape architecture) and is very well noticeable throughout the projects that i did during my master. (architecture)

My final project at the TU Delft led me to the question: ‘How can people find a  place to stay and wander in an airfield ?’ Since airfields are built for maximum cost and time efficiency all valuable minutes before flight are used seducing the already stressed traveller into spending just a bit more. In my opinion nothing is more ugly than capitalism under pressure. Ofcourse i am open for discussion.

Additionally believe that a very big part of the experience is also determined by the fact that every individual is considered a potential criminal. You actually feel relieved after you have been approved of ‘not being of criminal intent’ so allowed passage in to the ‘limbo-zone’ in between the security and the gate. [air-side]  The security zone within the airport can be seen as a rudimentary element that has the remembrance of less friendly times , left there in place as fall-back mechanism. You never know what might happen if one abandons this last threshold.  The combination of this controlled environment and the financial stress in which it is created results in an inhuman place.

So what is the deal with terminals: is it political? Is it economical? Is it aesthetics?

Train stations aren’t as inhuman compared to airports. There is a romanticism associated to a train station, especially if it is a large one,monumental and imposing, situated in the centre of a big town. It puts you in touch with the world around you, and travel by train is a truly dignified way of moving around. I aim for a more grandeuse aesthetic design of the terminal.A higher level of convenience and happiness. But above all i want to design a terminal that offers a place that evokes a serenity that suits the magic of flight..

My research is focussed on ‘the staying in an airport’, it aims for defining and redefining of the current idea of ‘the Terminal’. The research will include various airports within the region of UK, Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany. [Both typological and historical]

My research commences with a broad study, from the ‘architecture of waiting’ to the dynamic of the airports lobby, secondly it separate and organizes the results into categories of ‘quality of waiting’ and ‘quality of wandering’. Thirdly I aspire to reach out for other ‘terminal architecture’ typologies [such as the train-station] hoping to collect and study references of different interesting types of ‘waiting rooms’, ‘lobby’s and ‘shops’.

 

For more info check Tumblr:

http://bikecollectornr1.tumblr.com/

 

Poetics in the ordinary

Poetics in the ordinary

Eke Wondaal

“A building should be a shell around the life to be lived within it, a shell that will satisfy material as well as intellectual demands. The architect creates not life, but conditions for life.”  (Kay Fisker, 1947)

Participatory methods in Architectural Design:
 Building up belonging and identity 
in deprived urban areas.

Participatory methods in Architectural Design:
 Building up belonging and identity 
in deprived urban areas.

Mar Muñoz Aparici

I am fascinated by the power of citizen participation in architectural design. In general terms, citizens only have a limited influence in the standard design process which is usually lead by administration and coordinated by private parties.

How would stronger involvement of inhabitants affect the existing process? What would the effect be in their group interaction and their connection to the built environment? Could these synergies develop a neighborhood’s identity?

Research on participatory initiatives both in urbanism and architecture will bring up the main achievements and challenges of these methods and will enlighten the voids for further personal research. The conclusions from that investigation will be the foundations for a design proposal of a public building in the neighborhood of Nazaret in Valencia (Spain). This devalued coastal area lost its connection with the sea -literally and metaphorically- along with the port’s growth until reaching a depressed problematic status. Its increasing lack of identity feeling would allow me to test out my findings and see what is the effect both for the people and for the design.

The model that will emerge from my project could be a powerful tool for designers and planners to re-conceive the creation of public values by empowering civic society.

How to involve different stakeholders in the design process?

How to involve different stakeholders in the design process?

Heleen van Russen Groen

Our built environment doesn’t always respond to the use requirements of different users. That could be caused by different things. First of all the users of a building change or their needs change, but I think there is also a lack of knowledge sharing between the architect and the (future) user. There is a gap between those two.

The interest in participatory design increases. For example in the renovation of social housing: In this case a certain percentage of the residents has to agree to let the renovation continue, what makes it very interesting for the housing association to let the residents participate. The thing is that when we have a closer look at these design processes, most of the time there isn’t much real participation. Where de architect traditionally came up with only one solution, now he/she comes up with a couple of design solutions. The resident can only choose color. In other words: in the design process the user may help to choose an option, but he isn’t allowed to help making the options.

How to involve different stakeholders in the design process? How to let a layman participate in the design process? How to become aware and use the knowledge of the user expert?

Critical Regionalism: Balancing tradition and Modernity in Moroccan housing

Critical Regionalism: Balancing tradition and Modernity in Moroccan housing

Salima Benaissa

My fascination for social housing in Morocco started by seeing the differences each year while travelling to this country. The large scale contemporary housing projects are becoming more common each year without the projects being designed for its environment. This contemporary architecture is problematic because it does not fit in the environment and the culture of the country, which is not only the case in Morocco but in a huge part of the second and third world countries. In order to create a sustainable type of housing in these areas it is important to understand the local circumstances of the country and the area that is built in. These aspects all fall under the term critical regionalism, a term that will play a huge role in finding the right way of designing balanced housing in Morocco.

 

(re-)considering the Bank of England

(re-)considering the Bank of England

Loed Stolte

For my graduation in explore lab, I want to combine two fascinations of mine, the one very old and the other fairly recent: classicism and capitalism. Therefor, my project concerns an architectural reconsideration of the main building of the Bank of England, located in the hart of the City of London. Given the current dispute about the functioning of the banking sector and the monetary system on the one hand and, on the other, the continuing question how to deal with heritage as designers, I believe my project to be at the hart of current processes, both in society and in the discipline of architecture.

 

Past

The Bank of England is the world’s oldest central bank and has for centuries been one of the major institutions in (inter)national capitalism. The Bank’s building has a uniquely rich architectural history, which coincides generally with the development of capitalism through its different stages. Two crucial episodes in the buildings history are its expansion under the supervision of Robert Taylor and most famously John Soane in the late eighteenth century, roughly during the lifetime of Adam Smith, and its rebuilding by Herbert Baker, commenced during the Great Depression of 1928.

 

Present

Now, in the aftermath of the credit crisis of 2008, the consequences of the last big bust in our global financial system are still being suffered throughout the world. It is in Great Britain that both economists and activists at the moment take the lead regarding a serious reconsideration of the monetary system, or: the origin of money, that is underlying capitalism. And, therefor, also the Bank of England, responsible for Britain’s monetary policy, is critically being evaluated and alternative roles are being suggested. However, meanwhile its building history has stultified since the end of the War.

 

Future

My project concerns the architectural manifestation of a renewed Bank of England within the future reinvention of capitalism and central banking. As the awareness of the necessity of a fundamental reorganization of the monetary system grows, I consider this the occasion to re-establish the lost connection between the Bank’s architecture and the development of capitalism. It is therefor that I do not intend to start from a utopian tabula rasa condition, proposing an entirely new design, but rather want to rework the existing building, which, likewise current capitalism, is just the temporary result of a complex process of historic alterations.

A social incubator

A social incubator

Veerle Rigter

I am fascinated by the potential of architecture to (re)connect people. How to create an inviting place for exchange of experience, knowledge, matter and space that could be beneficial for all?

Since 90% of our society will be living in cities in the future and there is a shortage of space, resources and finance, sharing spaces and services could offer a solution. In a society where individualism and loneliness are considered a serious problem  for the future , I personally think people would benefit from a social environment where an exchange of knowledge, space and goods is possible.

Nowadays, a shift from the individual to the collective can be seen in our current society, from ownership to usage. People don’t necessarily want to possess items or services anymore, as long as they can use them when wanted. This sharing of matters or services requires a certain adaptation of lifestyle. I would like to investigate to which extend matter, services and spaces are sharable, how this influences the lifestyle of its users and derived from this, how architecture can stimulate a positive attitude towards the sharing of space and services and thus create an inviting place for exchange.

 

Castle of Good Hope

Castle of Good Hope

Benjo Zwarteveen

In 2009 I visited the “Castle of Good Hope”, a Dutch fortress in Capetown’s city centre, built around 1670. The coming year I want to research what value South Africa and its people give to the Dutch heritage in SA.

In the design which follows the research, I want to investigate how I can make a design which is of importance for Capetown or South Africa. I’m thinking about designing a memorial space, a community space, a building for the national archives, a national museum for colonial heritage, depending on the outcome of the research.